drawpaintprint:

Coiled Serpent, 15th–early 16th centuryMexico; AztecStone; H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm)
Metropolitan Museum:

Serpents held an important place in the belief systems of many peoples in ancient Mexico and they are the most frequently portrayed animals in art. Serpents had multiple connotations and inspired sky and earth imagery alike. Above all, they were fertility symbols, probably suggested by their terrestrial habitat and periodic skin shedding. At the Main Temple in the Aztec imperial capital Tenochtitlan, serpent depictions proliferate: monumental snake heads, probably representing different species—with open fanged mouths and forked tongues—flank braziers and stairways leading to the sanctuaries. The temple itself is said to have been surrounded at the time of the Spanish conquest by a serpent wall, or Coatepantli, formed by hundreds of adjoining sculptures of snakes. In three-dimensional stone sculpture, serpents are most frequently shown coiled or knotted, as in this example. Carved from a porous stone, the body of the reptile is a tightly wound knot; the tail end with two rattles in shallow relief is visible on one side. Its flattened head, emerging from the tangled body at the top, has a pointed, closed mouth, and sunken oval eyes under bulbous supraorbital ridges. The function of this snake sculpture is uncertain.

drawpaintprint:

Coiled Serpent, 15th–early 16th century
Mexico; Aztec
Stone; H. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm)

Metropolitan Museum:

Serpents held an important place in the belief systems of many peoples in ancient Mexico and they are the most frequently portrayed animals in art. Serpents had multiple connotations and inspired sky and earth imagery alike. Above all, they were fertility symbols, probably suggested by their terrestrial habitat and periodic skin shedding. At the Main Temple in the Aztec imperial capital Tenochtitlan, serpent depictions proliferate: monumental snake heads, probably representing different species—with open fanged mouths and forked tongues—flank braziers and stairways leading to the sanctuaries. The temple itself is said to have been surrounded at the time of the Spanish conquest by a serpent wall, or Coatepantli, formed by hundreds of adjoining sculptures of snakes. In three-dimensional stone sculpture, serpents are most frequently shown coiled or knotted, as in this example. Carved from a porous stone, the body of the reptile is a tightly wound knot; the tail end with two rattles in shallow relief is visible on one side. Its flattened head, emerging from the tangled body at the top, has a pointed, closed mouth, and sunken oval eyes under bulbous supraorbital ridges. The function of this snake sculpture is uncertain.

(Source: metmuseum.org, via buffleheadcabin)

newyorker:

A cartoon by Edward Steed. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue.

newyorker:

A cartoon by Edward Steed. Take a look at more cartoons from this week’s issue.

(Source: newyorker.com)

nevver:

Swell

nevver:

Swell

ganesheverywhere:

Auspicious elephants of India 

ganesheverywhere:

Auspicious elephants of India 

sarapocock:

OCTOBER IS HERE.

sarapocock:

OCTOBER IS HERE.

(via jamesurbaniak)

tracietaylorphotography:

ineffable

tracietaylorphotography:

ineffable

explore-blog:

Too-ticky’s Guide to Life – wisdom on uncertainty, presence and self-reliance from beloved Scandinavian children’s book author Tove Jansson via her Too-ticky character, based on the love of Jansson’s life. 

explore-blog:

Too-ticky’s Guide to Life – wisdom on uncertainty, presence and self-reliance from beloved Scandinavian children’s book author Tove Jansson via her Too-ticky character, based on the love of Jansson’s life. 

"Circumstances don’t make the man, they only reveal him to himself."

Epictetus (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

(via gnowing)

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

cybergata:

Elephants walking through a rain forest.

(via feedthecrows)

workman:

nihongogahanasenai:

So everyone really seemed to like artworks depicting crows. So here is a  compilation of artwork by Kawanabe Kyōsai
In order:

Crow on a Rock :http://metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208c-015b-414a-940b-b57d76631780}&oid=60025770&pg=5&rpp=20&pos=83&ft=*

Crow and Willow Tree: http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208C-015B-414A-940B-B57D76631780}&oid=60025785&pg=4&rpp=20&pos=75&ft=*

Two Crows on a Pine Branch: http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208C-015B-414A-940B-B57D76631780}&oid=60025752&pg=4&rpp=20&pos=80&ft=*

Crow and the Moon:http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208C-015B-414A-940B-B57D76631780}&oid=60025774&pg=4&rpp=20&pos=74&ft=*

Crow Flying in the Snow: http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208C-015B-414A-940B-B57D76631780}&oid=60025783&pg=4&rpp=20&pos=77&ft=*

Crow and Reeds by a Stream: http://metmuseum.org/exhibitions/view?exhibitionId={6651208c-015b-414a-940b-b57d76631780}&oid=60025757&pg=5&rpp=20&pos=1&ft=*

(via ushishir)

magictransistor:

Asa Smith. Celestial Illustrations from Smith’s Illustrated Astronomy. 1851.

Contd from here